How-to Make Pickled Daikon – A Recipe with Yuzu ゆず大根

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2 pickled daikon images collaged for pinterest pin with text overlay

Let’s make super easy Japanese pickled Daikon together.  You will not need a jar or container only the ingredients. Prepare the ingredients and mix them all together in a ziplock bag and put it in the fridge. That’s it! You will be addicted to this crunchy and refreshingly flavoured daikon with Yuzu with hint of bird’s eye chili spiciness. This is a pickle especially for adults.

Pickled daikon with yuzu served in a small bowl with a yuzu fruit in background

Table of contents

What is Pickled Daikon with Yuzu(ゆず大根)

Pickled Daikon with Yuzu is a Japanese side dish popular in the Kyoto area. It is a simple, easy and quick recipe for pickled daikon radish in rice vinegar with yuzu peel. Pickling daikon radish with yuzu adds a unique refreshing citrusy flavour to the ordinary pickled daikon taste.

Pickled Daikon with yuzu picked by a pair of chopsticks

Ingredients for Pickled Daikon

Daikon – read more about Daikon radishes nutrition benefits, where to buy, how it is used in Japanese cooking, how to store etc. in “Ultimate guide to Japanese daikon radish[1]

Yuzu[2] – is a citrus fruit which originated in China but is widely cultivated in Japan. Because of its distinctive elegant scent which makes food and sweets refreshing, it became popular to use Yuzu overseas as well as in Japan.  

Rice vinegar[3]  – is made from fermented rice and has a mellow and slightly sweeter flavour than white vinegar. It is used widely in Japanese cooking and is a key ingredient for sushi rice.

cut daikon, a yuzu fruit, sugar, salt, rice vinegar and birdseye chilli

How to pick good ingredients?

Choose a Daikon radish which has white and smooth skin and which is firm and taut to the touch. When you hold it, it should feel heavy and solid. Choose a Daikon which has not had the leaves cut off, as the leaves are edible too. If the leaves have been cut off then avoid Daikon where the cut area has dried and new leaves are shooting as this indicates it is an  it is not a fresh daikon.

For Yuzu, pick yuzu fruit that has a taut and firm skin. Avoid squishy and wrinkled yuzu fruit, and choose fruit that feels heavy when you hold it and has a beautiful fragrance. You will find both Daikon and Yuzu in asian grocery stores. If you can’t find any of the ingredients, see FAQ for substitutes.

5 yuzu fruits in a shallow bowl and 2 in background

How to Pickle Daikon with Yuzu?

If you can get a whole Daikon, use the bottom part of the daikon as it has less moisture than the top part of the daikon.  Seasonings more easily penetrate the dryer bottom part so it is preferred for pickles.

Rinse the daikon, julienne it and sprinkle salt over the julienned daikon and leave it for at least half an hour to remove some of the moisture from the Daikon. Peel the yuzu and squeeze out the juice. Squeeze moisture out of Dakon with your hand and place it in a ziplock bag. Add all vinegar pickling ingredients into a ziplock bag and leave it in the fridge for two (2) to twelve (12) hours.

a pile of daikon at a fresh produce market

Three Tips to Make Delicious Pickled Daikon

1. The white pith of Yuzu peel has a strong astringent taste. Remove the white part as much as possible when you peel the yuzu.

2. You can eat the. pickled daikon after 2 hours but the longer you pickle the tastier it gets as the sweet vinaigrette penetrates through the daikon.  

3. Use rice vinegar and sea salt if possible or table salt if not.

4 images collage of making pickled daikon process with numbers
a 4 image collage for making pickled daikon process

What to Serve with?

Pickled in a sweet vinaigrette with the refreshing Yuzu flavour, this pickled daikon recipe is very popular especially in the Kyoto area. Because of the refreshing taste and crunchy texture, “Yuzu Daikon” is often used as Hashi yasume dishes, which are small side dishes served between mains or appetisers. It is good to serve with the following main dishes.

Gyoza[4]

Chicken Nanban[5]

Beef Negimaki Roll up[6]

Karaage Japanese Fried Chicken[7]

Yakitori[8]

6 gyoza dumplings in a cast iron skillet

FAQ

Q: Are Pickled Daikon Healthy?

A: Yes, Daikon is a vegetable and contains minerals such as calcium  iron, folic acid and Vitamin C, E and potassium and other nutrients.

Q: Is this pickled Daikon fermented?

A: No, fermentation does not occur in the pickling process.

Q: How should Yuzu Daikon be stored?

A:After daikon has been pickled for 2 hours or longer, transfer the yuzu daikon to an airtight container or mason jars and store it in the refrigerator.

Q: How long can you store this yuzu daikon pickle in the fridge?

A: Yuzu daikon is prepared by dehydrating the daikon with sodium. Removing moisture with salt suppress the growth of bacteria and prolongs the freshness. It will keep for 3-5 days refrigerated. Since it is so easy to make, it’s best to make a small batch each time and store it in the fridge.

Q: If some of the ingredients are not available, what can I substitute with?

A: Daikon can be replaced with any other radish available in your local area, and you can use a lemon instead of yuzu. Also rice vinegar can be substituted by apple cider vinegar or white wine vinegar. See the Japanese food substitutes post here[9].

yuzu daikon served in a small bowl with a yuzu fruit in background

Stay Connected

If you like the recipe please rate the recipe and leave comments below. Also don’t forget to follow me on Youtube[10], Pinterest[11], Facebook[12], Twitter[13] and Instagram[14]. This way you keep up to date with all the latest happenings on Chopstick Chronicles. Don’t forget to Sign up for a weekly newsletter so you never miss out on new authentic delicious Japanese recipes! Sign up form is on the right-hand sidebar.

Pickled daikon with yuzu served in a small bowl with a yuzu fruit in background

Easy Pickled Daikon with Yuzu

Let’s try this easy recipe and enjoy pickled daikon. This is a pickle for adults. Use yuzu citrus and try this unique pickle!

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Course: Appetiser, Salad, Side Dish

Cuisine: Japanese

Prep Time: 30 minutes

Cook Time: 5 minutes

Pickling time: 2 hours

Total Time: 2 hours 35 minutes

Servings: 1

Calories: 211kcal

Ingredients

Instructions

  • Rinse and jullien the daikon.

  • Place the daikon in a mixing bowl and sprinkle with the salt. Set aside for 20 minutes.

  • Prepare yuzu by peeling the yuzu fruit and cutting it into strips.

  • Juice the yuzu. Squeeze out yuzu juice at least 1 tbsp.

  • After 20 min, drain the liquid from the salted daikon and squeeze any further moisture out with your hands.

  • Place all the prepared ingredients, daikon, yuzu peel, yuzu juice, rice vinegar, sugar and dried chili into a zip lock bag.

  • Massage all ingredients over the ziplock bag and refrigerate for a minimum of 2 hours. *4

  • Serve or transfer the pickled daikon into an airtight container for storing.

Notes

*1 Yuzu fruit vary in size. As a guide, we need about 1 tbsp of juice and you can use the peel though make sure to remove white pithy part as much as you can as it has an astringent taste. 
*2 If you can not source this ingredient, see the post above or “Japanese food substitute[19]
*3 I use a dried birds eye chili called “Taka no tsume[20]” in Japanese. 
*4 If you can not wait, you can start to eat after 2 hours of pickling, though it will be tastier if left overnight (8 hours) in fridge. 

Nutrition

Calories: 211kcal | Carbohydrates: 53g | Protein: 3g | Fat: 1g | Saturated Fat: 1g | Polyunsaturated Fat: 1g | Monounsaturated Fat: 1g | Sodium: 1218mg | Potassium: 581mg | Fiber: 6g | Sugar: 43g | Vitamin A: 50IU | Vitamin C: 75mg | Calcium: 92mg | Iron: 1mg

References

  1. ^ Ultimate guide to Japanese daikon radish (www.chopstickchronicles.com)
  2. ^ Yuzu (www.chopstickchronicles.com)
  3. ^ Rice vinegar (www.chopstickchronicles.com)
  4. ^ Gyoza (www.chopstickchronicles.com)
  5. ^ Chicken Nanban (www.chopstickchronicles.com)
  6. ^ Beef Negimaki Roll up (www.chopstickchronicles.com)
  7. ^ Karaage Japanese Fried Chicken (www.chopstickchronicles.com)
  8. ^ Yakitori (www.chopstickchronicles.com)
  9. ^ here (www.chopstickchronicles.com)
  10. ^ Youtube (www.youtube.com)
  11. ^ Pinterest (www.pinterest.com)
  12. ^ Facebook (www.facebook.com)
  13. ^ Twitter (twitter.com)
  14. ^ Instagram (www.instagram.com)
  15. ^ Print (www.chopstickchronicles.com)
  16. ^ Pin (www.pinterest.com)
  17. ^ Rate (www.chopstickchronicles.com)
  18. ^ Shihoko | Chopstick Chronicles (www.chopstickchronicles.com)
  19. ^ Japanese food substitute (www.chopstickchronicles.com)
  20. ^ Taka no tsume (www.amazon.com)

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